Make Code Club part of your summer school plans! 

Code Club provides the ideal in-person enrichment activity for a summer school, providing fun projects to build skills and confidence around coding concepts, along with important well-being needs. It’s also a great way to form friendships and feel part of the school community.

We share three key essentials, plus a NEW Summer of Sport activity to make sure that your summer school Code Club is a success! 

Make it fun!

Code Club is a fun, informal learning space, where young learners have the opportunity to explore and get creative together with code! Learn what topics and programming languages your coders are interested in, then take a look at our free step-by-step projects where coders are introduced to key coding concepts. 

North Ayrshire Council run Code Club summer schools, this is what they had to say: 

Just go for it. It’s going to be super fun. I mean, who doesn’t love Scratch? Don’t make it formal, it’s not school, it will be loud and a lot of wondering about with the kids seeing what each other is getting up to. And you don’t have to be a coding expert, Code Club has loads of excellent resources. 

Looking for that first fun project to work on at your summer school? Then why not create some noise in Scratch with ‘Rock band’! Learners will explore how to use code to change a sprite’s costume, make a sprite react to an input, and add sounds! 

Head outside

We know that being active helps us to stay healthy, both physically and mentally. Take your Code Club offline, head outside, and try these Raspberry Pi projects to explore coding concepts and computers! 

Computers in the real world: go for a walk and notice how technology interacts with everyday life. 

Pixel art unplugged project: club members learn how computers create and store images and how to use (x,y) coordinates. 

Compass coding: follow codes and compass directions to get back to camp!

Celebrate achievements 

Make time within each session for a show-and-tell, giving learners the opportunity to celebrate their projects and share their new skills together.

Celebrate everyone’s successes and download a Code Club certificate from your club’s dashboard. Think about sharing your achievements with the school community through a newsletter — young coders could even help write this! 

Could you use this great idea from North Ayrshire Council?

At the end of each day we encourage members to put a post on the wall about what they learned that day or what they most enjoyed.

On your marks, get set, go! 

To help you off the starting blocks for your summer school coding activities, dig out your tracksuits and participate in our Summer of Sport activity! We have handpicked six Scratch sport-themed projects, including a favourite ‘Beat the goalie’ to help you get started! Find out how your club can get involved.

Get in touch and let us know how you plan to use Code Club as part of your summer school activities. Remember to share your achievements with us on Twitter at Code Club UK or Code Club World using the hashtag #MyCodeClub! 

Online tips to blast into orbit with Astro Pi Mission Zero!

Astro Pi Mission Zero gives young people the opportunity to blast their program into space and send a message to the astronauts on board the International Space Station. 

With many of you supporting young people to learn to code from home, Ruth from The Mount School Code Club in York shares some tried-and-tested tips for taking Astro Pi Mission Zero online. 

What is Astro Pi Mission Zero? 

Astro Pi Mission Zero is an engaging challenge to write a simple Python program that will run on the International Space Station. The code will run for up to 30 seconds on one of the two Astro Pi computers that are on the space station. 

Step-by-step instructions are available to help young people take part in this year’s challenge, which involves measuring the humidity in the Columbus module and displaying a colourful message on the Astro Pi’s LED matrix for the astronauts to read!

It can be completed in person or as part of an online session. Entries can be submitted either individually, or as part of a team of 2–4 young people. 

The closing date for entries is Friday 18 March and Astro Pi is open to ESA Member States, as well as Slovenia, Canada, Latvia, and Malta.

Two young girls with long brown hair sat facing a laptop at a table. In the corner of the image an animation of of a astronaut is giving a double thumbs up.

Ruth’s top tips on delivering Astro Pi Mission Zero online 

Code Club educator Ruth has helped her club go into orbit with Mission Zero. Read her four top tips to make sure you have a smooth mission from online classroom to space! 

1. Show them where their code is going to run 

Engage the kids in the project before they start writing any code. I showed them a Raspberry Pi with a Sense HAT and we watched the video at the start of the project so they could see the Astro Pi computers onboard the space station. Take a look at Google Street View of the ISS, and see if you can find them on board! 

It helped them realise that the code they were about to write was actually going to be run in space!

2. Teach them the underscore (_) key! 

Kids are now used to typing on a computer, however, there are some keys that we use in code that they may not be so used to. For example in the Astro Pi project, the underscore key (_) is used often.

An astronaut in onboard the International Space Station and is pointing towards the Astro Pi's.
The Astro Pi onboard the International Space Station (Image credit ESA)

3. Fixing bugs together 

To help fix a bug, I’ll ask them to share their screen and make their code font larger on Trinket. Everyone benefits from this, as all the kids can see the problem and learn from it. Coders often help each other rather than me helping them, which is great and I always encourage this.

4. Take your time 

Astro Pi Mission Zero can be completed in one session, but we took our time and completed the project in three sessions. We used the first session for setting up, explaining the project and working on the scrolling message to appear. The second session was about investigating how to get the picture to appear, and the third session was using the sensor to read the value and to respond differently depending on the value it’s received.

Ruth’s last piece of advice:

“[At] each small step in this project I’ve seen the kids’ faces light up when they see their code working how they wanted it to and now that they know their code is actually going to be used somewhere it makes them feel even prouder. I’ve had comments from parents saying it’s the most engaged they’ve seen their child in a long time.”

My Code Club is paused

If your club is paused, we have a step-by-step video to guide coders through Mission Zero. You can share the video link and they can blast their code into orbit from the comfort of their own home! 

Connect with the Code Club team on Twitter at Code Club UK or Code Club World and let us know how your coders get on with Astro Pi Mission Zero! 

Community members share advice for running online Code Club sessions!

We understand that going online to run a Code Club session might be making you feel a little nervous. We’re here to support you every step of the way on this new learning journey. Check out our new guidance on online sessions, and read on to hear top tips and words of advice from Code Club educators around the world.

Try it! 

After a summer break, Meriden Code Club are back running online club sessions on Zoom. They shared these words of encouragement: 

“For people worried about starting something online, or doing anything different with their club, a tip would be to just try it; people won’t expect perfection from day one and you’ll learn so much about what works for you and your club.” 

Encourage creativity

Leeds Libraries created a multilevel game at their online Code Club session. We asked what their top three tips would be:

  1. Make content available in a range of formats and on different platforms to allow as much accessibility to participants as possible.
  2. Create projects with flexible goals in mind to allow for different skill sets and interpretations. 
  3. Encourage creativity! If a coder wants to try something different to what you had in mind, let them run with it. You’ll be amazed at what they come up with.
Lee has attended Leeds Libraries online sessions

Slow your sessions down 

Nicola from Code Club Australia has given some advice on how the pace of your Code Club may change:

“Talk and progress through the lesson much slower than you would face to face, and explain every detail (otherwise you’ll have to repeat it, many times).”  

Nicola from Code Club Australia

Adjust your Code Club start time

Adam runs Fleetville Code Club and has been running online Code Club sessions, using Scratch and Minecraft. Adam shared his advice to help your online sessions run more smoothly: 

  1. Assume your first session is going to be all about getting people set up on their computers. The students might use Scratch at school, but getting it running at home at the same time as a Zoom call takes a little getting used to. 
  2. An after-school online club session will need to start a bit later than an in-school club since the children need to get home ( now many schools have staggered leaving times). 
  3. Students are just as thrilled by receiving online certificates as they are by the paper equivalents – use the Code Club ones or prepare some of your own.

If you are running online sessions and want to share your tips with the rest of the community, write to us at support@codeclub.org and we’ll make sure to pass them on.